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Water & Waste Water

Solar thermal solutions for safety at high temperatures

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Water & Waste Water

The power of the sun can be harnessed with solar thermal for hot water, backup heating, swimming pools and process heat. To obtain a durable connection between collectors and buffer tank, a robust system is recommended. Sanha has safe series made of copper or stainless steel in its portfolio for this purpose.

As a rule, dual-circuit systems are installed for solar thermal energy, where a water-glycol mixture is used in the first circuit. This piping must be able to withstand high temperatures and be glycol and pressure resistant. In outdoor applications, the necessary weather and corrosion resistance must also be provided. These requirements are met by the SANHA-Press Solar series made of copper and the NiroSan Industry and NiroTherm Industry series made of stainless steel.

FKM sealing rings are used in both press systems. They have the appropriate temperature resistance up to 160 °C. This is important because high standstill temperatures can be reached on flat-plate collectors.

Vacuum tube collectors have even higher requirements. Temperatures of up to 280 °C can occur at critical points, for example when the system is restarted after a shutdown. Here, it is recommended that the collectors and the solar circuit, as well as the other starting points in the solar circuit itself, be connected by brazing. Brazed connections are considered to be particularly safe. For this application, too, the manufacturer offers a suitable solution in the form of 5000 series solder fittings.

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WPL wastewater technology is selected by major logistics hub

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Technology from water recycling specialist WPL, a WCS Group company, was selected by DP World London Gateway to provide enhanced ammonia removal to protect sensitive waters in the Thames Estuary. 

DP World London Gateway is a smart logistics center on the north bank of the Thames in Thurrock, Essex, 25 miles from central London. The water recycling specialist will supply a bespoke treatment plant for a new freestanding warehouse for 150 office workers, currently under construction at the logistics center. The plant will be able to handle a flow of 7.5 m3/d for 100 population equivalents.

The treatment plant will discharge into an environmentally sensitive swale that empties into the Thames Estuary and must meet the Environment Agency’s stringent standards of 15:15:03 mg/l for ammonia and suspended solids.  The water specialist will provide an underground HiPAF (High Performance Aerated Filter) system for ammonia removal, as well as a metering unit and sand filter to further improve the final effluent in accordance with site-specific permit requirements. The design also includes a small pumping system due to the depth of the incoming effluent and a pumped backflow chamber.

Dominic Hamblin, WPL’s technical director, said, “DP London Gateway is a key logistics hub and we are pleased to be able to deliver this environmental solution on site on its behalf.

“WPL’s modular HiPAF product range meets the stringent European standards for permitting wastewater without the use of chemicals. The technology is regularly used by UK water utilities and is a good choice for sensitive sites such as marshes, which are shallow and not heavily diluted.

“The HiPAF’s compact design allows it to be installed in locations where space is at a premium, such as a busy commercial area. In addition, our sand filters are designed to remove excess suspended solids and biological oxygen demand when permit standards are above what would normally be expected from a biological process. 

“Once operational, the plant will provide robust wastewater treatment while being quiet, visually unobtrusive and easy to maintain. WPL’s wastewater treatment plant is being built by Readie Construction. Construction is scheduled to begin before the end of 2021 and is expected to take 12 weeks.

“DP World London Gateway is a high-profile site surrounded by sensitive water bodies. We are therefore pleased to be working with WPL to install on-site wastewater treatment for the new warehouse building.”  

– Giuseppe Orlando, Project Manager 

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Gain for technical managers in wastewater treatment plants

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On October 20, 2021, Atlas Copco will launch its fall seminar series with a special for technical managers in wastewater treatment plants. In addition to the technical lecture, the 30-minute event also offers the opportunity for a live chat with the speaker. Further dates are already being planned.

The seminar is aimed at all those who are responsible for biological wastewater treatment in wastewater treatment plants and are interested in optimization potentials in activation, e.g. through the use of energy-efficient low-pressure blowers. The seminar will focus on explanations of the municipal guidelines, information on funding opportunities and how to apply for them. The technically oriented part will cover, among other things, the differences between V-belt and gear ratios, information on usable volume flow according to ISO 1217 and ISO 1343, and examples of energy-saving potential. The detailed agenda can be found on the Atlas Copco website under Compressed Air Knowledge.

“In my seminar, you can expect topics that I have specially adapted and designed for compressed air users in water treatment plants: – What does the energy optimization of a compressed air system look like, What motor efficiency classes are there and what are the differences, Technology comparison: gear vs. V-belt ratio, , Rotary piston vs. screw element – always compare “apples with apples”, Delivery quantities of blowers and reference conditions, Total power consumption as an indicator of actual consumption, A savings potential sample calculation, Comments and explanations on the municipal directive, Some practical examples. After my presentation, you are welcome to chat for questions and comments.”

– Atlas Copco

Atlas Copco’s online seminars are designed by practitioners for practitioners and are of particular interest to those responsible for compressed air and gas supply systems in industrial plants, as well as engineering and planning offices that have to deal with these projects. The topics of the seminars offered range from an introduction to the basic knowledge required for compressed air generation, to the physical principles, the various technologies and their fields of application, to practice-oriented proposals for solutions. Participation is free of charge. In order to be able to guarantee an optimal and as interactive as possible course of the webinar, the maximum number of participants is limited.

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Evidence of another achievement of the Baltic Sea ecosystem

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They mitigate climate change and prevent algal blooms – and they can also reduce concentrations of potentially harmful bacteria in seawater, according to the latest research: seagrass beds provide another ecosystem service for us humans, according to a study now published by researchers in Kiel. The findings provide further incentive for the protection and restoration of these long-underrated ecosystems in the German Baltic Sea.

It has been known for some time that seagrass beds can absorb nutrients and thus prevent over-fertilization of the seas and thus algal blooms. In addition, their important role as a marine carbon sink is also increasingly recognized, which means they can counteract the greenhouse effect. In a study now published in the journal Marine Biology, a team of researchers from GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel has demonstrated that native seagrass meadows can also improve water quality with respect to potentially harmful bacteria: Water from the densely vegetated submarine areas contains fewer vibrios – naturally occurring bacteria that can be harmful to health in high concentrations.

At five locations in the Bay of Kiel, divers took targeted water samples from overgrown and vegetation-free sandy bottoms. In the laboratory, these were placed on a plate coated with nutrient solution. After a few days, the Vibrio colonies that formed were counted. Analyses showed that water from seagrass beds contained an average of 39 percent fewer Vibriones and 63 percent fewer of the potentially harmful Vibrio vulnificus/cholerae type compared to unvegetated areas.

The underlying mechanism of action will be studied in more detail in the future. “It is conceivable both that the increased sedimentation in the dense meadow leads to the settling of fine particles to which vibrions also adhere,” explains Professor Thorsten Reusch, marine biologist at GEOMAR and leader of the study. “But it could also be that chemical substances from the seagrass leaves inhibit the growth of the bacteria.”

“Our pilot study was motivated by a 2017 Science publication that showed a reduction of coral and human pathogens for tropical meadows wherever dense seagrass meadows grow between human settlements and reefs. Now, for the first time, we have been able to demonstrate similar functions for our native waters.”

– Prof. Thorsten Reusch

The new results are of particular importance because all climate models predict above-average warming in the future in combination with a sweetening of the Baltic Sea. “These are exactly the environmental conditions that will lead to the further spread of vibrios also on bathing beaches in summer,” said Professor Ute Hentschel Humeida, microbiologist at GEOMAR and co-author of the publication. The study also highlights the crucial importance of seagrass beds as a nature-based solution for the health of shallow water ecosystems and their water quality. Thus, it provides further incentives for the protection and restoration of these long underestimated coastal ecosystems.

 

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