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Chemical Applications
From Batchwise to Continuous Production

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Chemicals
Immediately after the presentations questions by the audience were answered by the experts (from left to right: Oliver Beiser, Head of Special Applications Team, Business Unit Engineering Plastics & Special Applications; Ulrich Bartel, Division President Compounding & Extrusion; Frank Lechner, Head of Process Technology Compounding & Extrusion, all Coperion; Guido Arzt, global process team at Henkel Adhesives & Sealants, Henkel). Picture: Coperion

Over 150 participants from approximately 15 nations came to Stuttgart, Germany on13 and 14 November 2018, accepting their invitations to the 2018 Coperion Extrusion Days. In keeping with the motto “Batch to Conti”, the conference took up an often-discussed current topic in the chemical industry, surrounded in controversy, that offers enormous savings potential, while reliable information regarding its safety and dependability often remains unavailable. Presentations by internal and external experts, plant tours, and live presentations gave professionals in attendance new insights into the basics of modern extrusion with co-rotating twin screw extruders and their enormous performance gains — relative to production volume — versus batchwise mixing and homogenization processes. Such understanding serves to aid participants in decision making for their own uses. A central focus of many presentations was on maintaining constant formulations to meet specifications using application-specifically optimized extruders, feeding systems, and monitoring systems. Concrete case examples demonstrated successful conversions from batch to extruder technology and the significant increases in production capacity enabled thereby, with at least equal product quality and, in any case, significantly better quality consistency.

A ZSK 34 Mv PLUS twin screw extruder was the central element in a demonstration of HMPSA (Hot Melt Pressure-Sensitive Adhesive) manufacturing.  In this example, a Roll-ex  system masticated rubber balls on hand as a formula component so far as to enable continuous extruder feeding.

Use of a demonstration extruder with a transparent plastic housing allowed Coperion Stuttgart’s research & development team to give visitors the ability to see for themselves how differently designed mixing elements ensure complete mixing of two fluids with different viscosities. A CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) flow simulation shown in parallel demonstrated the broad agreement between theory and practice. Coperion is implementing this process in order to evaluate newly developed screw elements and mixtures, among others.

“In the meantime, continuous processes are being implemented in many industries for countless applications and mixtures. The advantages of consistent quality at concurrently higher efficiency nowadays are also attractive arguments for many users in the chemical industry to potentially change over from batch processes to continuous production”, said Oliver Beiser, Team Leader of Chemical Applications of Coperion’s Compounding & Extrusion Division.

The variety of questions raised in the forum, as well as the animated discussions during breaks between event blocks, demonstrated how great the need is for information in this field, and how that need extends far beyond what is available. Time and again, participants expressed amazement at the versatile possibilities shown, even in their own companies, to increase productivity with short-term ROI and increased quality consistency. Of particular note for participants was a comparison of scrap quantities that Guido Arzt, member of the global process team at Henkel Adhesives & Sealants, elucidated during his presentation.

Moreover, during one extensive plant tour, participants at the 2018 Extrusion Days gleaned an impression of Coperion’s vertical integration at its Stuttgart location, ranging from screw element and extruder barrel manufacturing to final assembly of twin screw extruders.

Chemicals Food & Beverage Pharmaceuticals Safety & Security

RFID access control in hazardous areas
Fast and secure access to processes

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Integrated RFID readers for fast and secure access control at HMI systems also in hazardous areas. Picture: R. Stahl
Integrated RFID readers for fast and secure access control at HMI systems also in hazardous areas. (Picture: R. Stahl)

Security and access control are given top priority in the production process, as unauthorised users and operating errors can cause great damage. R. Stahl is the only manufacturer in the market offering its explosion-protected Thin Clients with RFID authentication for secure identification of staff with access authority for process control and data communication from the field. On the basis of three technology platforms, the Thin Clients have been designed to meet the different requirements of the chemical and pharmaceutical industries, the food industry as well as oil and gas production.

Additional logins in the automation system are no longer required due to the faster, direct RFID access control, which meets the current security requirements according to FDA and Gamp. It supports transponders with Mifare, Desfire, EV1 or Legic Advant reader technologies. Unlike biometric processes, the contactless RFID technology is also suitable for hygienically sensitive areas where obligatory protective clothing makes authorisation via fingerprint or face recognition impossible. R. Stahl’s explosion-protected RFID readers have been certified for Zones 1/21 and 2/22. They are either available as separate units with a USB interface for panel mounting, or they are integrated directly into the operator enclosures or keyboards by the manufacturer.

The Thin Clients designed for the oil and gas industry with the Shark technology device platform and 21.5″ touchscreens are also available with a RFID reader installed behind the front plate. User authorisation via RFID requires the installation of a suitable device driver in the control system software. On request, the company will provide cards and key fobs equipped with tested transponders for use in hazardous areas.

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Chemicals Measurement, Instrumentation, Control & Automation News Pharmaceuticals Plant Construction, Engineering & Components Water & Waste Water

Dialogue between manufacturers and users
Satisfied customers through integration

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Dialogue between manufacturers and users. At the Open Integration meeting in Reinach, Switzerland, in early June, representatives from the chemical and pharmaceutical industries explained how they benefit from the partner program during digitalization of their process control systems. Picture: Endress + Hauser
Dialogue between manufacturers and users. At the Open Integration meeting in Reinach, Switzerland, in early June, representatives from the chemical and pharmaceutical industries explained how they benefit from the partner program during digitalization of their process control systems. (Picture: Endress + Hauser)

35 Open Integration partners gathered together at Endress + Hauser in Reinach, Switzerland, to share their experiences and thoughts for the first time. A highlight of the event was a presentation from representatives of the chemical and pharmaceutical industries outlining how they benefit from the partner program during digitalization of their processes – and what they would like to see in the future.

The goal of the Open Integration program initiated by Endress + Hauser can be summed up quickly: the simple, fast and manufacturer-independent integration of components and devices into various automation systems. And, almost more importantly, satisfied customers.

While it sounds simple in theory, when it comes to day-to-day system operation, it’s far from that. Even the most experienced automation specialists have great respect for multi-vendor systems. That also applies to complete solutions “from a single source.” After all, digital communications – a precondition for the extensive use of existing intelligence in field devices and systems – places serious demands on integration.

With its Open Integration partner program, Endress + Hauser is inviting providers of control technology, fieldbus infrastructure, measurement technology and actuator systems to test and document the interaction of their products even more extensively in the interests of their customers. The cooperation partners include Auma Riester, Bürkert, Festo, Flowserve, Hima Paul Hildebrandt, Honeywell Process Solutions, Mitsubishi Electric, Pepperl + Fuchs, Phoenix Contact, Rockwell Automation, Schneider Electric and Turck.

Open standards as a basis

The foundation of this effort is open communication standards (Hart, Profibus, Foundation Fieldbus, EtherNet/IP or Profinet), as well as open integration standards (FDT, EDD, FDI). With a nearly unlimited selection of options, the reference topologies represent practical combinations suitable for applications in the chemical, life sciences, food & beverage, oil & gas, power & energy, primaries & metal and water & wastewater industries.

The reference topologies take into account industry-typical requirements such as explosion protection, availability and redundancy. Each topology is thoroughly tested and documented in the lab in Reinach in conjunction with the partners, after which the recommendations are published.

Interoperability tests create added value

And how do customers benefit from the Open Integration partner program? Every problem that the integration experts discover prior to commissioning can be resolved at a much lower cost compared to fixing the issue in the field at some later point. Customers receive concrete, validated recommendations for automating their systems, which go well beyond established conformity and interoperability testing while ensuring seamless integration. Last but not least, they save time and money.

With developments such as IIoT and APL, users will face new challenges, plus integration testing will be given added weight. This makes it even more important for the Open Integration partners to work together over the long term. The participating customer and provider representatives were in full agreement on this point. Cyber security, in addition to the issue of connectivity, will play a key role in the future. They furthermore agreed that effective strategies need to be developed to counter new entrants in the automation industry such as IBM or Amazon.

Customer-driven developments

One thing was clear during the get-together in Reinach in early June: the process control industry wants open, interoperable systems instead of proprietary solutions. One of the users wants uniform, structured access to static information via QR- and RFID-supported type plates in accordance with DIN 91406. Standardized diagnostics in line with NE 107 is also at the top of the wish list.

In the near term, Endress + Hauser wants to work with its partners to address these and other open issues with the aim of utilizing Open Integration to offer customers even more value-add during digitalization of their processes. The common goal: satisfied customers who can extensively utilize the opportunities that digitalization brings with little risk.

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Chemicals Mechanical & Thermal Processes Plant Construction, Engineering & Components

Metal bellows
The ideal connection

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Jakob Antriebstechnik
Picture: Jakob Antriebstechnik

In the manufacture of metal bellows couplings, bellows and hub connections are a critical issue. While steel or stainless steel couplings can be combined with a special micro plasma welding process, this method is not suitable for combinations of aluminum and steel. Adhesive bonding processes can be used here, but they can fail under extreme operating conditions (chemicals, very high or low temperatures). Especially in the case of clutches on the input side of a planetary gear, high temperatures can occur in critical applications which could loosen the adhesive bonds.

The developed and long-time patented joining process (crimping-in-press process), on the other hand, is optimally suited for connecting multi-layer stainless steel bellows without clearance to aluminum hubs. Here the operation is certainly possible even in temperature ranges from -50 ° C to + 350 ° C.

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