Connect with us

News

New gearbox solution
Efficient conveyor belt drive

Published

on


News

Flender

The new gearbox solutions with low loss and high transmission power. Efficient conveyor belt drive: High quality. High transmission. Maximum efficiency.

Request info material now!

You would like to know more? Just fill out the form.

Your company

Position

Your name

Your first name

Mail address

Phone number

News Water & Waste Water

Water Action Platform
Latest learnings

Published

on

Assessing risk and determining responses to Covid-19 were major themes of the most recent Water Action Platform webinar which took place on 9 July.  Here are six key learnings from the interactive event which was hosted by Isle chairman Piers Clark.

  1. Expect seasonal resurgence of Covid-19
    Recent research shows that we can expect resurgence of Covid-19 due to seasonal fluctuations. In an interview on the Water Action Platform webinar on 9 July, hydrologist Fernando Miralles-Wilhelm, Chair and Professor at University of Maryland said research into the environmental conditions needed for virus outbreaks to “explode” showed the sweetspot for temperature was between 5-11oC and for relative humidity, between 40-70%. He also explained that this information is not yet included in predictive models.Miralles-Wilhelm said, “We do expect resurgence of the virus. It’s a seasonal virus like influenza. As we have very good ways to predict weather and climate we can expect to see a resurgence in November/early December in the northern hemisphere.

    “If we are prepared and take the social distancing measures needed, we can minimise the impact. We have plenty of warning, there is no excuse for not being ready.”

  2. Wastewater detection can give early warning on Covid
    The potential for wastewater to act as an early-warning-system for outbreaks of Covid-19 in communities is being demonstrated by Canadian technology company LuminUltra. Repeatedly testing everyone in a given population for Covid-19 may not be feasible, but identifying and quantifying the presence of SARS-CoV-2 in their collective wastewater can serve as an early warning system, alerting health authorities.Patrick Whalen, chief executive, LuminUltra said, “The science is still evolving but what we know is that people not only infect others directly, but also through air and surfaces. There is potential for wastewater to act as early warning system, to determine the presence of asymptomatic carriers without having to run tests directly on people.”

    Responding to a government callout for technologies for diagnostic testing, LuminUltra contacted Public Health Canada and offered to help shore-up the supply chain for reagents.

    The company has now produced 5 million quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) tests for Canada and is helping other countries.

  3. Sewage based epidemiology costs quantified
    Participants in the Water Action Platform have been keen to better understand the cost of implementing a sewage-based epidemiological system. A new research paper from a collaboration between engineering consultancy Arup, KWR research institute in the Netherlands and Exeter University in the UK outlines the tasks and costs associated with designing an early-warning system and cites two main cost elements.The first is the initiation phase during which systems are set up, for which the costs are estimated at £200,000. Deployment costs then have to be factored in and for populations of 3-5 million that could run up to £1 million, depending on localised variables.

    Spanish technology company GoAigua has developed a similar pricing model which shows that costs vary depending on size and complexity of the utility and the number of samples, the cost of which ranges from US$30-50 dollars per unit.

  4. Far-UVC light inactivates coronaviruses safely
    Recent research carried out in the US has shown that far-UVC light – wavelengths in the 207-222nm range – efficiently inactivates airborne human coronaviruses. It is well known that conventional germicidal UVC lamps, emitting 254nm wavelengths, can be used to disinfect unoccupied spaces such as empty hospital wards and train carriages, but direct exposure poses a health hazard to humans and cannot be used in occupied spaces.The new study from Columbia University Irving Medical Center found that more than 99.9% of seasonal coronaviruses present in airborne droplets were killed when exposed to a particular wavelength of ultraviolet light that is safe to use around humans. Far-UVC light cannot penetrate the tear film on the surface of the eye or the outermost layer of skin so it cannot damage living cells in the human body.
    Isle chairman Piers Clark said, “At these low dose rates, far-UVC exposure might well provide a method for reducing the virus in public locations. On its own this doesn’t solve the pandemic, but it’s definitely part of the solution.”
  5. Very low risk of virus spreading through sewage
    An ongoing review of the available academic literature by analysts from Isle continues to conclude that the risk of contracting Covid-19 through exposure to sewage is very low. A recent paper on transmission in recreational waters in the journal Science of the Total Environment says that while wastewater is a potential dissemination route for SARS-CoV-2 to recreational waters, there is limited data on the presence and viability of the virus in water bodies.Isle chairman Piers Clark says, “More research is needed, but we hold to our previously stated conclusions that the risk of the virus spreading through sewage is very low.”
  6. Workplace diversity accelerated at innovation sprint
    A collaborative sprint on Improving Workplace Diversity in the Water Industry will take place as part of the Northumbrian Water Innovation Festival. The event, which facilitates sprints and challenges to help solve real-world water issues, will be delivered digitally and internationally for the first time and takes place from 14-17 September.Isle is leading the diversity sprint which will take place 24-hours-a-day, over all four-days of the festival.

    Isle chairman Piers Clark said, “We’re going to look at how we can improve workplace diversity in the water sector and I’m delighted that a much wider group can get involved than ever before, from anywhere around the world. We aim to highlight key issues, gather data and share best practice on a topic which very relevant, especially in light of the Black Lives Matter movement.”

Continue Reading

News Pharmaceuticals Plant Construction, Engineering & Components

Coronavirus
Easing of COVID-19 in northern China

Published

on

The northern Chinese province of Hebei offers great potential for pharmaceutical investment as it has been one of the leading regions for pharmaceutical production. Though it has been heavily impacted by COVID-19 in recent months, the region has strong merger and acquisition (M&A) potential due to a large number of small companies with a single facility operating in the area, says GlobalData, a leading data and analytics company.

Adam Bradbury, PharmSource Analyst at GlobalData, comments: “On 6 June 2020, Hebei and neighboring Beijing lowered their COVID-19 emergency response from level two to level three, which allows for essential travel by lifting certain purchasing restrictions on plane and train tickets from travelers from low-risk areas. This reduction of COVID-19 alertness levels is a sign that the Northern provinces are slowly getting back to business. If a second wave of infection can be avoided, the area has much potential for investment from international pharma manufacturers to further expand their presence among the predominantly domestic companies.”

Most companies with more than one facility in the region are headquartered in China. There is a small presence of international pharma companies and CMOs, a sign this region’s pharmaceutical industry is still developing and will need to do more to encourage investment from international companies.

Bradbury concludes: “The majority of facilities (84%) in northern China belong to companies with a single site in the region, which indicates the high M&A potential of the area’s pharma industry. In addition, Chinese pharma manufacturing is becoming more developed and increasingly exporting to other countries. The value of the Chinese pharma market is increasing due to the domestic aging population and therefore, the inevitable increasing demand for medicines.”

Continue Reading

Biotechnology News Pharmaceuticals Plant Construction, Engineering & Components

Two additional production halls
Expansion of capacities for the production of consumables

Published

on

Eppendorf significantly expands capacities for the production of consumables
Picture: Eppendorf

The Eppendorf Group is expanding its production capacity at the Oldenburg in Holstein site in Germany by building two additional production halls. As a result, Eppendorf Polymere GmbH, a wholly owned subsidiary of Eppendorf AG, will increase its total capacity by around 30 percent from 2021. A milestone for this targeted expansion was reached May 14, 2020 with the topping-out ceremony for the second hall currently under construction. The first hall has already been completed and will start production operations this month.

In Oldenburg, Eppendorf produces laboratory consumables made of high-quality plastic such as pipette tips and tubes, microtiter plates and single-use bioreactor vessels. Currently, these products are in particularly high demand from diagnostic laboratories and vaccine manufacturers around the world who are researching vaccines against the corona virus or carrying out Sars Cov-2 tests.

“We are registering a steady increase in demand for consumables from Eppendorf. The current global battle against the corona virus is just reinforcing this trend,” says Dr. Wilhelm Plüster, Chief Technology Officer at Eppendorf AG. “With the construction of the two new production halls we are responding to this trend, which has been continuing for years. In addition, sustainability was taken into account in the construction of the buildings.” continues Plüster. The two production halls will be heated and cooled by an existing combined heat and power plant. This will considerably reduce energy consumption.

Continue Reading